Crazy, Busy Spring

Juggling the three jobs — writing teacher, novelist, and journalist — has been nuts this year, but I finished one job for now.  Yep, the novel, The Celestial Matchmaker, is done.  (At least until I have to revise it again.) 🙂  So wish me luck, and send good karma.

With that blast of heat, the forsythia and daffodils came and went. It’s very unusual to have my dogwoods (which mean love despite adversity) and red camellias (unpretending excellence) blooming at the same time, but it would make a meaningful tussie-mussie. Everything is such a lovely shade of green now!

Back to my article for the wonderful Arlington Magazine.  This piece explores the question:  are we better parents than our parents were?  I get to interview teens next!

 

The Next Big Thing – Holly Cupala is up!

Hey all!  Just a quick update.  Holly Cupala, who has been incredibly busy with personal projects lately, updates us all on her latest work-in-progress.

I LOVE Holly’s books so far, Don’t Breathe a Word, and Tell Me a Secret.  I can’t wait to read her new one:  I’ll Never Tell.  Yup, that’s the title.  Read all about it here.

The Next Big Thing

My friend, Madelyn Rosenberg, has a book coming out next month called Canary in the Coal Mine, which I can’t wait to read!  Madelyn tagged me for The Next Big Thing Blog Hop, which is a very cool way to track some new writers and their upcoming books and current projects.  Thanks, Madelyn!!  So here are my answers:

1: What is the working title of your book?  The Celestial Matchmaker.

2: Where did the idea come from for the book?  A former professor of mine came to one of my book signings for Forget-Her-Nots.  He suggested that I write a book about Caroline Herschel, an important woman in astronomical history, and the sister to William Herschel, who discovered Uranus and built telescopes. The book isn’t about her at all, but I started to think about a girl on the roof looking for comets.

3: What genre does your book come under? Contemporary YA fiction.

4: Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition? Hmm.  I’d love a younger Jennifer Lawrence to play Caroline.  And I’d love Suraj Sharma to play Ben.

5: What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?  While looking for comets from her rooftop telescope, 17-year-old Caroline Browne, a.k.a. the Celestial Matchmaker of her high school, sees something she wishes she didn’t.

6: Is your book self-published, published by an independent publisher, or represented by an agency? Represented by Steven Chudney of the Chudney Agency.

7: How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript? It always takes me years to write a novel, and I need a firm deadline of about two months to finish it. (I just finished a draft I’m happy with last week!)

8: What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?  I love The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks, which my daughter just read, too.  I loved The Fault in Our Stars.  I love any books with strong female leads and deep emotional resonance.

9: Who or what inspired you to write this book? The story takes place in a small, fictional college town.  I’ve always wondered what it would be like to live in such a place, because I live outside D.C.  I’m also fascinated by what holds families together in times of incredible stress.

10: What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest? Star-shaped romantic notes, a rooftop tent, and a sexy next door neighbor.

And the next person I’m tagging is the wonderful YA novelist Holly Cupala, who is definitely worth waiting for!  You can find out all about Holly’s latest project here.

Come See Me!

I’ll be speaking and demonstrating the Language of Flowers at the U.S. Botanic Garden on Valentine’s Day again this year.  Get great ideas for how to boost your budding relationship.  🙂

Here’s the info and hope to see you there!

Van Gogh Fangirling

If you live within striking distance of Philly and love art, you shouldn’t miss the “Van Gogh Up Close” exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. It’s splendid! The show focuses on Van Gogh’s intense images of the natural world. As usual, his observations are unique for all time, and this show has paintings from all over the world, including many private collections. I haven’t missed many Van Gogh shows in the U.S., but there were tons of paintings I’d never laid eyes on before.

Best of all, I got to go to this show, because my daughter and her friends are huge Dr. Who fans, and Dr. Who (with Matt Smith) had a travel-through-time to meet Van Gogh show, which featured a sunflower painting. I happened to mention that there was a large exhibit in Philly, and they were up for it.  Of course, they had to nearly drag me out of the galleries.  Here are a few of my very favorites:

They are amazingly more alive and vibrant than these images, but you get the gist. And, oh, the brushstrokes. It’s so very difficult not to touch them, and – alas! – the exhibit closes 5/6.